Education · Language Arts & Disciplines

Online Library Genesis

Shadow Libraries
by Joe Karaganis

How students get the materials they need as opportunities for higher education expand but funding shrinks.

From the top down, Shadow Libraries explores the institutions that shape the provision of educational materials, from the formal sector of universities and publishers to the broadly informal ones organized by faculty, copy shops, student unions, and students themselves. It looks at the history of policy battles over access to education in the post–World War II era and at the narrower versions that have played out in relation to research and textbooks, from library policies to book subsidies to, more recently, the several “open” publication models that have emerged in the higher education sector.

From the bottom up, Shadow Libraries explores how, simply, students get the materials they need. It maps the ubiquitous practice of photocopying and what are—in many cases—the more marginal ones of buying books, visiting libraries, and downloading from unauthorized sources. It looks at the informal networks that emerge in many contexts to share materials, from face-to-face student networks to Facebook groups, and at the processes that lead to the consolidation of some of those efforts into more organized archives that circulate offline and sometimes online— the shadow libraries of the title. If Alexandra Elbakyan’s Sci-Hub is the largest of these efforts to date, the more characteristic part of her story is the prologue: the personal struggle to participate in global scientific and educational communities, and the recourse to a wide array of ad hoc strategies and networks when formal, authorized means are lacking. If Elbakyan’s story has struck a chord, it is in part because it brings this contradiction in the academic project into sharp relief—universalist in principle and unequal in practice. Shadow Libraries is a study of that tension in the digital era.

Contributors
Balázs Bodó, Laura Czerniewicz, Miroslaw Filiciak, Mariana Fossatti, Jorge Gemetto, Eve Gray, Evelin Heidel, Joe Karaganis, Lawrence Liang, Pedro Mizukami, Jhessica Reia, Alek Tarkowski


Social Perception and Social Reality
by Lee Jussim

Social Perception and Social Reality contests the received wisdom in the field of social psychology that suggests that social perception and judgment are generally flawed, biased, and powerfully self-fulfilling. Jussim reviews a wealth of real world, survey, and experimental data collected over the last century to show that in fact, social psychological research consistently demonstrates that biases and self-fulfilling prophecies are generally weak, fragile, and fleeting. Furthermore, research in the social sciences has shown stereotypes to be accurate. Jussim overturns the received wisdom concerning social perception in several ways. He critically reviews studies that are highly cited darlings of the bias conclusion and shows how these studies demonstrate far more accuracy than bias, or are not replicable in subsequent research. Studies of equal or higher quality, which have been replicated consistently, are shown to demonstrate high accuracy, low bias, or both. The book is peppered with discussions suggesting that theoretical and political blinders have led to an odd state of affairs in which the flawed or misinterpreted bias studies receive a great deal of attention, while stronger and more replicable accuracy studies receive relatively little attention. In addition, the author presents both personal and real world examples (such as stock market prices, sporting events, and political elections) that routinely undermine heavy-handed emphases on error and bias, but are generally indicative of high levels of rationality and accuracy. He fully embraces scientific data, even when that data yields unpopular conclusions or contests prevailing conventions or the received wisdom in psychology, in other social sciences, and in broader society.

Digital Genesis
by Christopher Barnatt

Digital Genesis charts the evolution of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence. From cloud AI services and autonomous robots, to 3D printers and quantum processors, the book details the latest digital technologies and predicts their future development and implications.

Late last century the human race learnt how to enter cyberspace. But in the 2020s the reverse will happen, with computers, robots and AI set to transform the physical world. Soon driverless vehicles will rule our highways, while many products will be manufactured in ‘dark factories’ by smart machines. Some of tomorrow’s most sophisticated technologies may even be organically grown using the latest digital science of synthetic biology.

Digital Genesis is written by futurist Christopher Barnatt, who in his 1995 book Cyber Business predicted the arrival of e-business and online social networks. Over 20 years later, he looks ahead to the Cognitive Computing Age, and beyond that to the era of ‘cyborg fusion’ in which the future of computing will become the future of ourselves.


Discrimination, Copyright and Equality
by Paul Harpur

Machine generated contents note: Foreword Gerard Goggin; Acknowledgements; 1. How technology has created the possibility of opening the book: from hard copy to e-books Introduction; 2. Access to information communication technologies, universal design and the new disability human rights paradigm introduced by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; 3. The weakening of the exception paradigm: the World Intellectual Property Organization changes path with the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled; 4. The role of copyright laws in restricting access to information and contributing to the book famine; 5. Exceptions to rights-holders’ exclusivity provides limited relief from the disabling impact of copyright; 6. Anti-discrimination laws help protect persons with disabilities against digital disablement, but who qualifies for protection?; 7. Causing digital disablement is not a trigger for regulation by anti-discrimination laws: ignoring capacity in favour of prescribed relationships; 8. The prohibition against discrimination: regulating for equality through retrofitting inaccessible systems; 9. Introducing positive duties in promoting equality outcomes for persons with disabilities: the United Kingdom Public Sector Equality Duty reducing digital disablement; 10. The right to digital equality in action: protections under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and human rights acts; 11. United States regulatory interventions targeting disability inclusive digital environments; 12. The enforcement of legal duties: protecting copyright or promoting reading equality?; Closing thoughts and new options to reduce digital disablement; Appendix: list of anti-discrimination and civil rights laws and tribunals/commissions impacting on disability in the federal and state/province jurisdictions in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States; Index

Free Culture
by Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence Lessig, “the most important thinker on intellectual property in the Internet era”, masterfully argues that never before in human history has the power to control creative progress been so concentrated in the hands of the powerful few, the so-called Big Media. Never before have the cultural powers- that-be been able to exert such control over what we can and can’t do with the culture around us. Our society defends free markets and free speech; why then does it permit such top-down control? To lose our long tradition of free culture, Lawrence Lessig shows us, is to lose our freedom to create, our freedom to build, and, ultimately, our freedom to imagine.

Genesis
by Hermann Gunkel, Cecil P. Staton, Mark E. Biddle, Joseph Blenkinsopp

Gunkel’s commentary on Genesis is a classic in the field of Old Testament studies. This translation makes it available in English for the first time. Gunkel’s familiarity with the religious and folk literatures of the world especially of the ancient Near East, provides the context into which he sought to situate Israelite religion and literature. Although he employed source- and form-critical methods, he brought a fine literary and cultural sensitivity to bear on the question of the interpretation of the text in its final forms. In fact, many who now criticize late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholarship for its atomism and aridity (Gunkel himself, expressed an awareness of these dangers) will be surprised to find Gunkel’s literary reading of Genesis and his engagement with the text inferior to none based on modern approaches. Many of the critical issues with which Gunkel grappled in his commentary continue to commend the attention of Genesis scholarship: the nature of patriarchal religion, the interrelationship between documentary sources, oral tradition, and editorial activity, the antiquity of Israel’s eschatological hope, and much more.

Genesis
by Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Mike Rutherford, Steve Hackett

The long-awaited, definitive story of one of the most creative and commercial rock groups of all time, Genesis

One of the most imaginative, courageous, and unpredictable music acts ever, Genesis evolved from pioneers of progressive music in the 1970s to a global phenomenon, topping charts and selling over 150 million albums worldwide. The story of their band spans thirty years and thirty albums, and through all the changes in the band’s line-up and musical direction, the spirit of Genesis has remained constant and undimmed.

Genesis: Chapter & Verse is the ultimate addition to any fan’s collection, setting the record straight as the band’s members tell their story their way. Remarkably, the band survived the high-profile departure of not one lead vocalist, but two (Peter Gabriel and Phil Collins), two influential guitarists (Anthony Phillips and Steve Hackett), and its best-known drummer (Phil Collins). Genesis simply got stronger and bigger – matching the huge solo success of Gabriel, Collins, and Mike + The Mechanics.

A collaboration between all the members of Genesis, past and present, Genesis: Chapter and Verse is the band’s definitive autobiography: an intimate, no-holds-barred, no-stone-unturned history that allows character and personality to come to the forefront. Covering the band’s story as well as the writing and performance of significant songs from each period, this treasure trove of text and photographs provides long-awaited insight into the way this exceptional group of songwriters worked together, allowing the band to dispatch more than a few sacred cows along the way. It is a book like none other, and an exclusive look into the life and times of one of rock’s most influential and lasting groups.

THE STORY OF GENESIS is told in Chapter & Verse by Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett, and Mike Rutherford, with the help of Anthony Phillips. Together, they recount Genesis’s journey from the band’s beginnings during schooldays through to the decision to reunite for the 2007 “Turn It On Again” tour.

Interspersed with the band’s reminiscences and reflections are comments from its most prominent travelling companions, sidemen, managers, confidants, and producers, all of whom share their personal memories of working with Genesis, as does the band’s loyal road crew.


Genesis 12-50
by Robert Davidson

Chapters 12-50 of the book of Genesis may be considered as enshrining the patriarchal traditions of the Jewish people. Besides the elements of poetry and legend embodied in these traditions, Professor Davidson shows that there can be a historical basis for the narratives and offers guidelines for exploring it. The Genesis stories cannot simply be seen as a reading back into earlier times of the background to the social customs and religious outlook of their later editors. Introductory sections deal with the sources, historicity and general character¬istics of the narratives, and are followed by a section-by-section presentation of the text with commentary in the established style of the series.

Shadow Libraries
by Joe Karaganis

How students get the materials they need as opportunities for higher education expand but funding shrinks.

From the top down, Shadow Libraries explores the institutions that shape the provision of educational materials, from the formal sector of universities and publishers to the broadly informal ones organized by faculty, copy shops, student unions, and students themselves. It looks at the history of policy battles over access to education in the post–World War II era and at the narrower versions that have played out in relation to research and textbooks, from library policies to book subsidies to, more recently, the several “open” publication models that have emerged in the higher education sector.

From the bottom up, Shadow Libraries explores how, simply, students get the materials they need. It maps the ubiquitous practice of photocopying and what are—in many cases—the more marginal ones of buying books, visiting libraries, and downloading from unauthorized sources. It looks at the informal networks that emerge in many contexts to share materials, from face-to-face student networks to Facebook groups, and at the processes that lead to the consolidation of some of those efforts into more organized archives that circulate offline and sometimes online— the shadow libraries of the title. If Alexandra Elbakyan’s Sci-Hub is the largest of these efforts to date, the more characteristic part of her story is the prologue: the personal struggle to participate in global scientific and educational communities, and the recourse to a wide array of ad hoc strategies and networks when formal, authorized means are lacking. If Elbakyan’s story has struck a chord, it is in part because it brings this contradiction in the academic project into sharp relief—universalist in principle and unequal in practice. Shadow Libraries is a study of that tension in the digital era.

Contributors
Balázs Bodó, Laura Czerniewicz, Miroslaw Filiciak, Mariana Fossatti, Jorge Gemetto, Eve Gray, Evelin Heidel, Joe Karaganis, Lawrence Liang, Pedro Mizukami, Jhessica Reia, Alek Tarkowski


Soil Genesis and Classification
by S. W. Buol, Francis Doan Hole, R. J. McCracken

Morphology of soils; Soil micromorphology; Soil composition and characterization; Weathering and soil formation; Pedogenic processes: internal, soil-building processes; Soil environment: External factors of soil formation; Parent material: initial material of the solum; Relief and landscape factors of the soil and its environment; Contributions of climate to the total soil environment; Organisms: biological portion of the soil and its environment; Time as a factor of soil formation; Principles and historical development of soil classification; Modern soil classification systems; Entisols:recently formed soils: Vertisols: shrinking and swelling dark clay soils; In ceptisols: emleryonic soils with few diagnostic features; Aridisols: soils of arid regions; Mollisols: grassland soils of steppes and prairies; Spodosols: soils with subsoil, accumulations of sesquioxide and humus; Alfisols:high base status soils; Ultisols: low base status forest soils: Oxisols: sesquioxide – rihch, highly weathered soils of the intertropical regions; Histosols: organic soils.

Business & Economics

Political Economics Book

Political Economics
by Torsten Persson, Guido Enrico Tabellini

What determines the size and form of redistributive programs, the extent and type of public goods provision, the burden of taxation across alternative tax bases, the size of government deficits, and the stance of monetary policy during the course of business and electoral cycles? A large and rapidly growing literature in political economics attempts to answer these questions. But so far there is little consensus on the answers and disagreement on the appropriate mode of analysis.

Combining the best of three separate traditions–the theory of macroeconomic policy, public choice, and rational choice in political science–Torsten Persson and Guido Tabellini suggest a unified approach to the field. As in modern macroeconomics, individual citizens behave rationally, their preferences over economic outcomes inducing preferences over policy. As in public choice, the delegation of policy decisions to elected representatives may give rise to agency problems between voters and politicians. And, as in rational choice, political institutions shape the procedures for setting policy and electing politicians. The authors outline a common method of analysis, establish several new results, and identify the main outstanding problems.


Modern Political Economics
by Yanis Varoufakis, Joseph Halevi, Nicholas Theocarakis

Once in a while the world astonishes itself. Anxious incredulity replaces intellectual torpor and a puzzled public strains its antennae in every possible direction, desperately seeking explanations for the causes and nature of what just hit it. 2008 was such a moment. Not only did the financial system collapse, and send the real economy into a tailspin, but it also revealed the great gulf separating economics from a very real capitalism. Modern Political Economics has a single aim: To help readers make sense of how 2008 came about and what the post-2008 world has in store.

The book is divided into two parts. The first part delves into every major economic theory, from Aristotle to the present, with a determination to discover clues of what went wrong in 2008. The main finding is that all economic theory is inherently flawed. Any system of ideas whose purpose is to describe capitalism in mathematical or engineering terms leads to inevitable logical inconsistency; an inherent error that stands between us and a decent grasp of capitalist reality. The only scientific truth about capitalism is its radical indeterminacy, a condition which makes it impossible to use science’s tools (e.g. calculus and statistics) to second-guess it. The second part casts an attentive eye on the post-war era; on the breeding ground of the Crash of 2008. It distinguishes between two major post-war phases: The Global Plan (1947-1971) and the Global Minotaur (1971-2008).

This dynamic new book delves into every major economic theory and maps out meticulously the trajectory that global capitalism followed from post-war almost centrally planned stability, to designed disintegration in the 1970s, to an intentional magnification of unsustainable imbalances in the 1980s and, finally, to the most spectacular privatisation of money in the 1990s and beyond. Modern Political Economics is essential reading for Economics students and anyone seeking a better understanding of the 2008 economic crash.


Pillars of Prosperity
by Timothy Besley, Torsten Persson

“Little else is required to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice; all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things.” So wrote Adam Smith a quarter of a millennium ago. Using the tools of modern political economics and combining economic theory with a bird’s-eye view of the data, this book reinterprets Smith’s pillars of prosperity to explain the existence of development clusters–places that tend to combine effective state institutions, the absence of political violence, and high per-capita incomes.

To achieve peace, the authors stress the avoidance of repressive government and civil conflict. Easy taxes, they argue, refers not to low taxes, but a tax system with widespread compliance that collects taxes at a reasonable cost from a broad base, like income. And a tolerable administration of justice is about legal infrastructure that can support the enforcement of contracts and property rights in line with the rule of law. The authors show that countries tend to enjoy all three pillars of prosperity when they have evolved cohesive political institutions that promote common interests, guaranteeing the provision of public goods. In line with much historical research, international conflict has also been an important force behind effective states by fostering common interests. The absence of common interests and/or cohesive political institutions can explain the existence of very different development clusters in fragile states that are plagued by poverty, violence, and weak state capacity.


Political Economy and Policy Analysis
by Antonio Merlo

Most of economics takes politics for granted. Through some (often implausible) assumptions, it seeks to explain away political structures by characterizing them as stable and predictable or as inconsequential in understanding what goes on in an economy. Such attempts are misguided, and this book shows how governments and political institutions are composed of people who respond to incentives and whose behavior and choices can be studied through the lens of economics.

This book aims to bridge the gap between economics and politics, and in doing so hopes to instill in the reader a deeper appreciation for social scientific thinking. Opening with a refresher on microeconomics and an introduction to the toolkit of political economy, it ensures that the necessary building blocks are in place before building up from the level of the individual and the firm to show how a political–economic equilibrium can be achieved. The text explores how to separate primitives—the external parts of a model that we cannot affect—from outcomes—the internal parts of a model that we can. Moreover, it demonstrates that economic and political issues alike can be studied within the same general framework of analysis.

Political Economy and Policy Analysis offers readers the chance to gain a more sophisticated understanding of political processes, economic processes, and the interplay among them. Adopting an applied microeconomics approach, it will be ideal for upper-level undergraduate or postgraduate courses on political economy, public choice, or policy analysis.

A complementary workbook with exercises and solutions that accompanies Political Economy and Policy Analysis is available for download under the eResources tab at: https://www.routledge.com/Political-Economy-and-Policy-Analysis/Merlo/p/book/9781138591783.


Political Economy in Macroeconomics
by Allan Drazen

Originally, economics was called political economy, and those studying it readily accepted that economic decisions are made in a political world. But economics eventually separated itself from politics to pursue rigorous methods of analyzing individual behavior and markets. Recently, an increasing number of economists have turned their attention to the old question of how politics shape economic outcomes. To date, however, this growing literature has lacked a cogent organization and a unified approach. Here, in the first full-length examination of how political forces affect economic policy decisions, Allan Drazen provides a systematic treatment, organizing the increasingly influential “new political economy” as a more established field at the highly productive intersection of economics and political science.

Although he provides an extraordinarily helpful guide to the recent explosion of papers on political economy in macroeconomics, Drazen moves far beyond survey, giving definition and structure to the field. He proposes that conflict or heterogeneity of interests should be the field’s essential organizing principle, because political questions arise only when people disagree over which economic policies should be enacted or how economic costs and benefits should be distributed. Further, he illustrates how heterogeneity of interests is crucial in every part of political economy. Drazen’s approach allows innovative treatment–using rigorous economic models–of public goods and finance, economic growth, the open economy, economic transition, political business cycles, and all of the traditional topics of macroeconomics.

This major text will have an enormous impact on students and professionals in political science as well as economics, redefining how decision makers on several continents think about the full range of macroeconomic issues and informing the approaches of the next generation of economists.


The Socialist Manifesto
by Bhaskar Sunkara

From one of the most prominent voices on the American Left, a galvanizing argument for why we need socialism in the United States today
With the stunning popularity of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Americans are embracing the class politics of socialism. But what, exactly, is socialism? And what would a socialist system in America look like?
In The Socialist Manifesto, Bhaskar Sunkara explores socialism’s history since the mid-1800s and presents a realistic vision for its future. The editor of Jacobin magazine, Sunkara shows that socialism, though often seen primarily as an economic system, in fact offers the means to fight all forms of oppression, including racism and sexism. The ultimate goal is not Soviet-style planning, but to win rights to healthcare, education, and housing, and to create new democratic institutions in workplaces and communities. A primer on socialism for the 21st century, this is a book for anyone seeking an end to the vast inequities of our age.

The Oxford Handbook of Political Economy
by Ward C Krebs Family Professor of Political Science Barry R Weingast, Barry R. Weingast, Donald A. Wittman, Barry E. Weingast

TheOxford Handbooks of Political Science is a ten-volume set of reference books offering authoritative and engaging critical overviews of the state of political science. Each volume focuses on a particular part of the discipline, with volumes on Public Policy, Political Theory, PoliticalEconomy, Contextual Political Analysis, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Law and Politics, Political Behavior, Political Institutions, and Political Methodology. The project as a whole is under the General Editorship of Robert E. Goodin, with each volume being edited by a distinguishedinternational group of specialists in their respective fields. The books set out not just to report on the discipline, but to shape it. The series will be an indispensable point of reference for anyone working in political science and adjacent disciplines.Over its long lifetime, “political economy” has had many different meanings: the science of managing the resources of a nation so as to provide wealth to its inhabitants for Adam Smith; the study of how the ownership of the means of production influenced historical processes for Marx; the study ofthe inter-relationship between economics and politics for some twentieth-century commentators; and for others, a methodology emphasizing individual rationality (the economic or “public choice” approach) or institutional adaptation (the sociological version). This Handbook views political economy asa grand (if imperfect) synthesis of these various strands, treating political economy as the methodology of economics applied to the analysis of political behavior and institutions.This Handbook surveys the field of political economy, with 58 chapters ranging from micro to macro, national to international, institutional to behavioral, methodological to substantive. Chapters on social choice, constitutional theory, and public economics are set alongside ones on voters, partiesand pressure groups, macroeconomics and politics, capitalism and democracy, and international political economy and international conflict.

The Political Economy of Development
by Just Faaland, Jack R. Parkinson

Economic development may be seen from many different points of view: in terms of history, theory or empirical generalization. The Political Economy of Development draws these points of view together as it explores the practice of economic development itself and considers the issues that arise in attempting to devise development strategies for developing countries and to implement them.

The term ‘political economy’ highlights the fact that economics cannot be conducted in isolation, and always has to be related to the political and social setting of the countries with which it is concerned. The Political Economy of Development foregrounds the political context of development in its study of applied economics.


Readings in Political Economy
by Kaushik Basu

Ranging from authoritative seminal pieces to striking contemporary papers, the readings in this volume explore the complex intersections between politics and economics from the perspectives of both disciplines.

The Political Economy of Africa
by Vishnu Padayachee

The Political Economy of Africa addresses the real possibilities for African development in the coming decades when seen in the light of the continent’s economic performance over the last half-century. This involves an effort to emancipate our thinking from the grip of western economic models that have often ignored Africa’s diversity in their rush to peddle simple nostrums of dubious merit.

The book addresses the seemingly intractable economic problems of the African continent, and traces their origins. It also brings out the instances of successful economic change, and the possibilities for economic revival and renewal. As well as surveying the variety of contemporary situations, the text will provide readers with a firm grasp of the historical background to the topic. It explores issues such as:

  • employment and poverty
  • social policy and security
  • structural adjustment programs and neo-liberal globalization
  • majority rule and democratization
  • taxation and resource mobilization.

It contains a selection of country specific case studies from a range of international contributors, many of whom have lived and worked in Africa. The book will be of particular interest to higher level students in political economy, development studies, area studies (Africa) and economics in general.


Computers

Introduction To Algorithms

Introduction To Algorithms
by Thomas H.. Cormen, Thomas H Cormen, Charles E Leiserson, Ronald L Rivest, Clifford Stein

The first edition won the award for Best 1990 Professional and Scholarly Book in Computer Science and Data Processing by the Association of American Publishers.

There are books on algorithms that are rigorous but incomplete and others that cover masses of material but lack rigor. Introduction to Algorithms combines rigor and comprehensiveness.

The book covers a broad range of algorithms in depth, yet makes their design and analysis accessible to all levels of readers. Each chapter is relatively self-contained and can be used as a unit of study. The algorithms are described in English and in a pseudocode designed to be readable by anyone who has done a little programming. The explanations have been kept elementary without sacrificing depth of coverage or mathematical rigor.

The first edition became the standard reference for professionals and a widely used text in universities worldwide. The second edition features new chapters on the role of algorithms, probabilistic analysis and randomized algorithms, and linear programming, as well as extensive revisions to virtually every section of the book. In a subtle but important change, loop invariants are introduced early and used throughout the text to prove algorithm correctness. Without changing the mathematical and analytic focus, the authors have moved much of the mathematical foundations material from Part I to an appendix and have included additional motivational material at the beginning.


Introduction to Algorithms
by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, Clifford Stein

The latest edition of the essential text and professional reference, with substantial new material on such topics as vEB trees, multithreaded algorithms, dynamic programming, and edge-based flow.

Some books on algorithms are rigorous but incomplete; others cover masses of material but lack rigor. Introduction to Algorithms uniquely combines rigor and comprehensiveness. The book covers a broad range of algorithms in depth, yet makes their design and analysis accessible to all levels of readers. Each chapter is relatively self-contained and can be used as a unit of study. The algorithms are described in English and in a pseudocode designed to be readable by anyone who has done a little programming. The explanations have been kept elementary without sacrificing depth of coverage or mathematical rigor.

The first edition became a widely used text in universities worldwide as well as the standard reference for professionals. The second edition featured new chapters on the role of algorithms, probabilistic analysis and randomized algorithms, and linear programming. The third edition has been revised and updated throughout. It includes two completely new chapters, on van Emde Boas trees and multithreaded algorithms, substantial additions to the chapter on recurrence (now called “Divide-and-Conquer”), and an appendix on matrices. It features improved treatment of dynamic programming and greedy algorithms and a new notion of edge-based flow in the material on flow networks. Many exercises and problems have been added for this edition. The international paperback edition is no longer available; the hardcover is available worldwide.


Algorithms Unlocked
by Thomas H. Cormen

For anyone who has ever wondered how computers solve problems, an engagingly written guide for nonexperts to the basics of computer algorithms.

Have you ever wondered how your GPS can find the fastest way to your destination, selecting one route from seemingly countless possibilities in mere seconds? How your credit card account number is protected when you make a purchase over the Internet? The answer is algorithms. And how do these mathematical formulations translate themselves into your GPS, your laptop, or your smart phone? This book offers an engagingly written guide to the basics of computer algorithms. In Algorithms Unlocked, Thomas Cormen—coauthor of the leading college textbook on the subject—provides a general explanation, with limited mathematics, of how algorithms enable computers to solve problems.

Readers will learn what computer algorithms are, how to describe them, and how to evaluate them. They will discover simple ways to search for information in a computer; methods for rearranging information in a computer into a prescribed order (“sorting”); how to solve basic problems that can be modeled in a computer with a mathematical structure called a “graph” (useful for modeling road networks, dependencies among tasks, and financial relationships); how to solve problems that ask questions about strings of characters such as DNA structures; the basic principles behind cryptography; fundamentals of data compression; and even that there are some problems that no one has figured out how to solve on a computer in a reasonable amount of time.


Introduction to Algorithms
by Udi Manber

This book emphasizes the creative aspects of algorithm design by examining steps used in the process of algorithm development. The heart of the creative process lies in an analogy between proving mathematical theorems by induction and designing combinatorial algorithms. The book contains hundreds of problems and examples. It is designed to enhance the reader’s problem-solving abilities and understanding of the principles behind algorithm design.
0201120372B04062001


Introduction to Algorithms
by CTI Reviews

Facts101 is your complete guide to Introduction to Algorithms. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

The Algorithm Design Manual
by Steven S Skiena

Most professional programmers that I’ve encountered are not well prepared to tacklealgorithmdesignproblems.Thisisapity,becausethetechniquesofalgorithm design form one of the core practical technologies of computer science. Designing correct, e?cient, and implementable algorithms for real-world problems requires access to two distinct bodies of knowledge: • Techniques – Good algorithm designers understand several fundamental – gorithm design techniques, including data structures, dynamic programming, depth-?rst search, backtracking, and heuristics. Perhaps the single most – portantdesigntechniqueismodeling,theartofabstractingamessyreal-world application into a clean problem suitable for algorithmic attack. • Resources – Good algorithm designers stand on the shoulders of giants. Ratherthanlaboringfromscratchtoproduceanewalgorithmforeverytask, they can ?gure out what is known about a particular problem. Rather than re-implementing popular algorithms from scratch, they seek existing imp- mentations to serve as a starting point. They are familiar with many classic algorithmic problems, which provide su?cient source material to model most any application. This book is intended as a manual on algorithm design, providing access to combinatorial algorithm technology for both students and computer professionals.

Mathematics of Big Data
by Jeremy Kepner, Hayden Jananthan

The first book to present the common mathematical foundations of big data analysis across a range of applications and technologies.

Today, the volume, velocity, and variety of data are increasing rapidly across a range of fields, including Internet search, healthcare, finance, social media, wireless devices, and cybersecurity. Indeed, these data are growing at a rate beyond our capacity to analyze them. The tools—including spreadsheets, databases, matrices, and graphs—developed to address this challenge all reflect the need to store and operate on data as whole sets rather than as individual elements. This book presents the common mathematical foundations of these data sets that apply across many applications and technologies. Associative arrays unify and simplify data, allowing readers to look past the differences among the various tools and leverage their mathematical similarities in order to solve the hardest big data challenges.

The book first introduces the concept of the associative array in practical terms, presents the associative array manipulation system D4M (Dynamic Distributed Dimensional Data Model), and describes the application of associative arrays to graph analysis and machine learning. It provides a mathematically rigorous definition of associative arrays and describes the properties of associative arrays that arise from this definition. Finally, the book shows how concepts of linearity can be extended to encompass associative arrays. Mathematics of Big Data can be used as a textbook or reference by engineers, scientists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and software engineers who analyze big data.


Computers

Structure & Interpretation Of Computer Programs

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
by Harold Abelson

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs has had a dramatic impact on computer science curricula over the past decade. This long-awaited revision contains changes throughout the text.

There are new implementations of most of the major programming systems in the book, including the interpreters and compilers, and the authors have incorporated many small changes that reflect their experience teaching the course at MIT since the first edition was published.

A new theme has been introduced that emphasizes the central role played by different approaches to dealing with time in computational models: objects with state, concurrent programming, functional programming and lazy evaluation, and nondeterministic programming. There are new example sections on higher-order procedures in graphics and on applications of stream processing in numerical programming, and many new exercises.

In addition, all the programs have been reworked to run in any Scheme implementation that adheres to the IEEE standard.


Instructor’s Manual to Accompany Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
by Julie Sussman, Harold Abelson, Gerald Jay Sussman

This instructor’s manual and reader’s guide accompanies the secondedition of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, by Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman with Julie Sussman.

This instructor’s manual and reader’s guide accompanies the second edition of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, by Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman with Julie Sussman. It contains discussions of exercises and other material in the text as well as supplementary material, additional examples and exercises, and teaching suggestions. An appendix summarizes the Scheme programming language as used in the text, showing at what point in the text each element of Scheme is introduced.


The Reasoned Schemer
by Daniel P. Friedman, William E. Byrd, Oleg Kiselyov, Jason Hemann

A new edition of a book, written in a humorous question-and-answer style, that shows how to implement and use an elegant little programming language for logic programming.

The goal of this book is to show the beauty and elegance of relational programming, which captures the essence of logic programming. The book shows how to implement a relational programming language in Scheme, or in any other functional language, and demonstrates the remarkable flexibility of the resulting relational programs. As in the first edition, the pedagogical method is a series of questions and answers, which proceed with the characteristic humor that marked The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer. Familiarity with a functional language or with the first five chapters of The Little Schemer is assumed.

For this second edition, the authors have greatly simplified the programming language used in the book, as well as the implementation of the language. In addition to revising the text extensively, and simplifying and revising the “Laws” and “Commandments,” they have added explicit “Translation” rules to ease translation of Scheme functions into relations.


Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics
by Gerald Jay Sussman, Jack Wisdom

The new edition of a classic text that concentrates on developing general methods for studying the behavior of classical systems, with extensive use of computation.

We now know that there is much more to classical mechanics than previously suspected. Derivations of the equations of motion, the focus of traditional presentations of mechanics, are just the beginning. This innovative textbook, now in its second edition, concentrates on developing general methods for studying the behavior of classical systems, whether or not they have a symbolic solution. It focuses on the phenomenon of motion and makes extensive use of computer simulation in its explorations of the topic. It weaves recent discoveries in nonlinear dynamics throughout the text, rather than presenting them as an afterthought. Explorations of phenomena such as the transition to chaos, nonlinear resonances, and resonance overlap to help the student develop appropriate analytic tools for understanding. The book uses computation to constrain notation, to capture and formalize methods, and for simulation and symbolic analysis. The requirement that the computer be able to interpret any expression provides the student with strict and immediate feedback about whether an expression is correctly formulated.

This second edition has been updated throughout, with revisions that reflect insights gained by the authors from using the text every year at MIT. In addition, because of substantial software improvements, this edition provides algebraic proofs of more generality than those in the previous edition; this improvement permeates the new edition.


How to Design Programs
by Matthias Felleisen, Robert Bruce Findler, Shriram Krishnamurthi, Matthew Flatt

This introduction to programming places computer science in the core of a liberal arts education. Unlike other introductory books, it focuses on the program design process. This approach fosters a variety of skills–critical reading, analytical thinking, creative synthesis, and attention to detail–that are important for everyone, not just future computer programmers. The book exposes readers to two fundamentally new ideas. First, it presents program design guidelines that show the reader how to analyze a problem statement; how to formulate concise goals; how to make up examples; how to develop an outline of the solution, based on the analysis; how to finish the program; and how to test. Each step produces a well-defined intermediate product. Second, the book comes with a novel programming environment, the first one explicitly designed for beginners. The environment grows with the readers as they master the material in the book until it supports a full-fledged language for the whole spectrum of programming tasks.

All the book’s support materials are available for free on the Web. The Web site includes the environment, teacher guides, exercises for all levels, solutions, and additional projects.

A second edition is now available.


Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs – 2nd Edition
by Harold Abelson , Gerald Jay Sussman, Julie Sussman

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License.


Simply Scheme
by Brian Harvey, Matthew Wright

An introductory-level text for students who are not majoring in computer science as well as for computer science majors with no prior programming experience, Simply Scheme teaches computer science from a functional/symbolic point of view. It provides a solid platform from which students can go on to study the seminal work Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs.

Beginners will find the authors’ approach sophisticated yet conversational and unintimidating. Using Scheme, a modern dialect of Lisp, they teach fundamental ideas and concepts of computer science — composition of functions, function as object, recursion, abstraction (data abstraction and procedural abstraction), and sequential (non-functional) techniques — in a way that avoids confusing technical pitfalls. Interesting nonmathematical programming examples use words and sentences as data; practical examples are represented by miniature spreadsheet and database programs.

Simply Scheme devotes five chapters to recursion, presenting distinct ways for readers to think about this watershed idea. There is also a chapter on file input/output, and students are able to work on substantial, realistic programming projects in the first semester.

Compared to Pascal- or C-based texts, Simply Scheme has many advantages in its use of the Scheme programming language. Scheme is interactive and allows for ease of program development and debugging; its first-class functions and automatic storage allocation provide a high level of abstraction so that programmers can concentrate on the desired goal instead of on the computer; its simple, uniform syntax doesn’t take up months of class time.

Simply Scheme differs from other Scheme-based books in its detailed and thorough exploration of the beginning steps in computer science. In addition to its emphasis on recursion, it also explores higher-order procedures and trees in depth, leaving object-oriented programming and the more difficult environment model for a later course. Simply Scheme extends the standard Scheme language with word and sentence data types to make symbolic programming easier for beginners. It also features a series of large sample programs and a series of suggested large programming projects.

Download the program files for use with the book


Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming
by Peter Norvig

Paradigms of AI Programming is the first text to teach advanced Common Lisp techniques in the context of building major AI systems. By reconstructing authentic, complex AI programs using state-of-the-art Common Lisp, the book teaches students and professionals how to build and debug robust practical programs, while demonstrating superior programming style and important AI concepts. The author strongly emphasizes the practical performance issues involved in writing real working programs of significant size. Chapters on troubleshooting and efficiency are included, along with a discussion of the fundamentals of object-oriented programming and a description of the main CLOS functions. This volume is an excellent text for a course on AI programming, a useful supplement for general AI courses and an indispensable reference for the professional programmer.


Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming
by Peter Van-Roy, Seif Haridi

Teaching the science and the technology of programming as a unified discipline that shows the deep relationships between programming paradigms.

This innovative text presents computer programming as a unified discipline in a way that is both practical and scientifically sound. The book focuses on techniques of lasting value and explains them precisely in terms of a simple abstract machine. The book presents all major programming paradigms in a uniform framework that shows their deep relationships and how and where to use them together. After an introduction to programming concepts, the book presents both well-known and lesser-known computation models (“programming paradigms”). Each model has its own set of techniques and each is included on the basis of its usefulness in practice. The general models include declarative programming, declarative concurrency, message-passing concurrency, explicit state, object-oriented programming, shared-state concurrency, and relational programming. Specialized models include graphical user interface programming, distributed programming, and constraint programming. Each model is based on its kernel language–a simple core language that consists of a small number of programmer-significant elements. The kernel languages are introduced progressively, adding concepts one by one, thus showing the deep relationships between different models. The kernel languages are defined precisely in terms of a simple abstract machine. Because a wide variety of languages and programming paradigms can be modeled by a small set of closely related kernel languages, this approach allows programmer and student to grasp the underlying unity of programming. The book has many program fragments and exercises, all of which can be run on the Mozart Programming System, an Open Source software package that features an interactive incremental development environment.


Structure and Interpretation of Classical Mechanics
by Gerald Jay Sussman, Jack Wisdom, Meinhard Edwin Mayer

This textbook takes an innovative approach to the teaching of classical mechanics, emphasizing the development of general but practical intellectual tools to support the analysis of nonlinear Hamiltonian systems. The development is organized around a progressively more sophisticated analysis of particular natural systems and weaves examples throughout the presentation. Explorations of phenomena such as transitions to chaos, nonlinear resonances, and resonance overlaps to help the student to develop appropriate analytic tools for understanding. Computational algorithms communicate methods used in the analysis of dynamical phenomena. Expressing the methods of mechanics in a computer language forces them to be unambiguous and computationally effective. Once formalized as a procedure, a mathematical idea also becomes a tool that can be used directly to compute results.

The student actively explores the motion of systems through computer simulation and experiment. This active exploration is extended to the mathematics. The requirement that the computer be able to interpret any expression provides strict and immediate feedback as to whether an expression is correctly formulated. The interaction with the computer uncovers and corrects many deficiencies in understanding.


Science

Blueprint

Blueprint
by Robert Plomin

A top behavioral geneticist makes the case that DNA inherited from our parents at the moment of conception can predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses.

In Blueprint, behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent life-long sources of our psychological individuality—the blueprint that makes us who we are. This, says Plomin, is a game changer.

Plomin has been working on these issues for almost fifty years, conducting longitudinal studies of twins and adoptees. He reports that genetics explains more of the psychological differences among people than all other factors combined. Genetics accounts for fifty percent of psychological differences—not just mental health and school achievement but all psychological traits, from personality to intellectual abilities. Nature, not nurture is what makes us who we are.

Plomin explores the implications of this, drawing some provocative conclusions—among them that parenting styles don’t really affect children’s outcomes once genetics is taken into effect. Neither tiger mothers nor attachment parenting affects children’s ability to get into Harvard. After describing why DNA matters, Plomin explains what DNA does, offering readers a unique insider’s view of the exciting synergies that came from combining genetics and psychology.


Blueprint
by Nicholas A. Christakis

Drawing on advances in social science, evolutionary biology, genetics, neuroscience, and network science, Blueprint shows how and why evolution has placed us on a humane path — and how we are united by our common humanity.

For too long, scientists have focused on the dark side of our biological heritage: our capacity for aggression, cruelty, prejudice, and self-interest. But natural selection has given us a suite of beneficial social features, including our capacity for love, friendship, cooperation, and learning. Beneath all our inventions — our tools, farms, machines, cities, nations — we carry with us innate proclivities to make a good society.
In Blueprint, Nicholas A. Christakis introduces the compelling idea that our genes affect not only our bodies and behaviors, but also the ways in which we make societies, ones that are surprisingly similar worldwide. With many vivid examples — including diverse historical and contemporary cultures, communities formed in the wake of shipwrecks, commune dwellers seeking utopia, online groups thrown together by design or involving artificially intelligent bots, and even the tender and complex social arrangements of elephants and dolphins that so resemble our own — Christakis shows that, despite a human history replete with violence, we cannot escape our social blueprint for goodness.
In a world of increasing political and economic polarization, it’s tempting to ignore the positive role of our evolutionary past. But by exploring the ancient roots of goodness in civilization, Blueprint shows that our genes have shaped societies for our welfare and that, in a feedback loop stretching back many thousands of years, societies have shaped, and are still shaping, our genes today.


Book Blueprint
by Jacqui Pretty

With the availability of self-publishing services and the rise of the entrepreneur as a thought leader, writing a book is becoming more appealing to an increasing number of small business owners. The problem? Most small business owners aren’t writers, have never written a book before, are time poor and don’t know where to start. While many want to write a book, they worry about investing months of their time and thousands of their dollars to write something that isn’t any good, or to not even finish. Book Blueprint gives a step-by-step framework that any entrepreneur can follow to write a great book quickly, even if they’re not a writer.

The Blueprint
by Jim Fannin

 For over forty years a simple life blueprint has been customized by Jim Fannin, the master coach for 2,500-plus of the “best of the best” in life, business, and sports. His plan is now available to you and it includes proven, concrete tools and techniques to enhance every aspect of your life.

You will learn tools to…

·      Swiftly reverse a negative day

·      Re-ignite the spark in your marriage

·      Reach peak performance at the right time and place

·      Gain more confidence and positive self-esteem

·      Find a “peaceful calm” when chaos and negative stress arrive

·      Simplify and balance your life

“My entire family has thrived with Jim Fannin’s blueprint for living a successful life,” says Julie McAllister, mother, wife, and business executive.

“For 10 years Jim Fannin has helped our student-athletes create a blueprint for their success. Our men’s golf program’s amazing achievements have Jim Fannin’s influence to thank,” says NCAA Coach of the Year Mike Small of the University of Illinois.

“Jim’s life blueprint with his powerful tools and techniques worked for me as a professional athlete and they continue to work as a business owner, father and husband,” says former MLB All-Star John Buck.

“With The Blueprint I changed my life and the direction of my company. Within two years I doubled my business and balanced and simplified my life,” says CEO Rob Wilson of Employco, USA

“If you want to organize your life in order to be your genuine, authentic, best self, Jim Fannin’s The Blueprint is the proven solution,” says CEO Mike Flaskey of Diamond Resorts International. 


Blueprint Reading
by Sam Kubba

Improve Your Ability to Read and Interpret All Types of Construction Drawings

Blueprint Reading is a step-by-step guide to reading and interpreting all types of construction drawings. Filled with hundreds of illustrations and study questions, this easy-to-use resource offers a complete overview of construction drawing basics for every aspect of the construction process- from site work, foundations, and structural systems to interior work and finishes.

Covering all the latest technological advances, noted architect Sam Kubba offers detailed information on:

  • Blueprint standards-ANSI, ISO, AWS, and ASME
  • Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided design and drafting (CADD)
  • Lines, views, elevations, and dimensions
  • Layouts of all construction drawing types-architectural, structural, mechanical, and electrical
  • Specifications-MasterFormat and UniFormat
  • Symbols-materials, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and others
  • How to avoid costly pitfalls on construction projects

You’ll also find a glossary of terms for quick reference, convenient tables and charts for identifying symbols and abbreviations, and much more.

Inside This Skills-Building Guide to Construction Drawing Basics

• Blueprint Standards • Blueprints and Construction Drawings: A Universal Language • Understanding Lines • Types of Views • Understanding Dimensions • Layout of Construction Drawings • Understanding Industrial Blueprints • The Meaning of Symbols • Understanding Schedules • Specifications • ISO Issues, Codes, and Building Regulations • Construction Business Environment


Privacy’s Blueprint
by Woodrow Hartzog

Every day, Internet users interact with technologies designed to undermine their privacy. Social media apps, surveillance technologies, and the Internet of Things are all built in ways that make it hard to guard personal information. And the law says this is okay because it is up to users to protect themselves—even when the odds are deliberately stacked against them. In Privacy’s Blueprint, Woodrow Hartzog pushes back against this state of affairs, arguing that the law should require software and hardware makers to respect privacy in the design of their products. Current legal doctrine treats technology as though it were value-neutral: only the user decides whether it functions for good or ill. But this is not so. As Hartzog explains, popular digital tools are designed to expose people and manipulate users into disclosing personal information. Against the often self-serving optimism of Silicon Valley and the inertia of tech evangelism, Hartzog contends that privacy gains will come from better rules for products, not users. The current model of regulating use fosters exploitation. Privacy’s Blueprint aims to correct this by developing the theoretical underpinnings of a new kind of privacy law responsive to the way people actually perceive and use digital technologies. The law can demand encryption. It can prohibit malicious interfaces that deceive users and leave them vulnerable. It can require safeguards against abuses of biometric surveillance. It can, in short, make the technology itself worthy of our trust.

The Blueprint
by J.P. Lewis, Joanna Everitt

In this collection, J.P. Lewis and Joanna Everitt bring together a group of up-and coming-political scientists as well as senior scholars to explore the recent history of the Conservative Party of Canada, covering the pre-merger period (1993-2003) and both the minority and majority governments under Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

The contributors provide nuanced accounts about the experience of conservatives in Canada which reflect the contemporary evolution of Canadian politics in both policy and practice. They challenge the assumption that Harper’s government was built upon traditional “toryism” and reveal the extent to which the agenda of the CPC was shaped by its roots to the Reform and Canadian Alliance Parties. Organized thematically, the volume delves into such topics as interest advocacy, ethno-cultural minorities, gender, the media, foreign policy, and more. The Blueprint showcases the renewed vigour in political studies in Canada while revealing the contradictory story of the modern Conservative Party.


Blueprint Reading Basics
by Warren Hammer

Written by a seasoned professional with more than 50 years experience in manufacturing, the new third edition of this widely used text and self-training manual has been expanded to include many new and revised worksheets designed to facilitate the reader’s ability to form a mental picture from a drawing. Blueprint Reading Basics reviews the subject in great detail using many illustrations and examples, as well as thoroughly reviewing all other aspects of print reading. It includes industry standards, practices, and copies of industrial prints throughout, providing a balanced presentation of blueprint reading theory and industry applications. And it is the perfect text for students taking blueprint reading, machine shop, or tool and die courses, as well as machinists, mechanics, technicians, and inspectors.

  • Each chapter thoroughly covers one subject and contains an introduction, a detailed review of the subject, illustrations, review questions, and worksheets with short and specific questions.
  • Many worksheets can be completed after studying one subject, meaning they can be reviewed before studying the entire chapter.
  • Discussions of mathematics, engineering theories, drafting techniques and machine shop practices are kept to a minimum.
  • All exercises can be used as teaching aids and have been classroom tested.
  • Stresses practical concerns through questions designed to reinforce techniques of calculating dimensions. Written in a nontechnical and easy-to-understand manner.

Blockchain
by Melanie Swan

Bitcoin is starting to come into its own as a digital currency, but the blockchain technology behind it could prove to be much more significant. This book takes you beyond the currency (“Blockchain 1.0”) and smart contracts (“Blockchain 2.0”) to demonstrate how the blockchain is in position to become the fifth disruptive computing paradigm after mainframes, PCs, the Internet, and mobile/social networking.

Author Melanie Swan, Founder of the Institute for Blockchain Studies, explains that the blockchain is essentially a public ledger with potential as a worldwide, decentralized record for the registration, inventory, and transfer of all assets—not just finances, but property and intangible assets such as votes, software, health data, and ideas.

Topics include:

  • Concepts, features, and functionality of Bitcoin and the blockchain
  • Using the blockchain for automated tracking of all digital endeavors
  • Enabling censorship?resistant organizational models
  • Creating a decentralized digital repository to verify identity
  • Possibility of cheaper, more efficient services traditionally provided by nations
  • Blockchain for science: making better use of the data-mining network
  • Personal health record storage, including access to one’s own genomic data
  • Open access academic publishing on the blockchain

This book is part of an ongoing O’Reilly series. Mastering Bitcoin: Unlocking Digital Crypto-Currencies introduces Bitcoin and describes the technology behind Bitcoin and the blockchain. Blockchain: Blueprint for a New Economy considers theoretical, philosophical, and societal impact of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies.


Blueprint
by Adam Schrager

Through the microcosm of Colorado’s stunning political transformation, this is an inside look at the rapidly-changing business of campaigns and elections. The techniques pioneered in Colorado have been recognized by both parties and pundits as the future of American politics.